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The a7R III is Sony’s New Weapon

The a7R III is Sony’s New Weapon in the Full Frame Camera Wars

Later this month, the new Sony a7R III will begin shipping to eager customers that shell out about $3,200 for the camera body.

This full frame monster is yet another warning shot by Sony that they are here to stay in the full frame camera wars.

The a7R II is a heck of a camera, and one that has won many accolades, including an incredibly high rating for its sensor by DxOMark.

However, the third-generation of this camera makes the second-generation of this camera look like a chump in many ways.

And, you guessed it, Nikon and Canon have taken notice…

Sony a7R III: A Quick Overview

The a7R III has a 42.4-megapixel full frame BSI CMOS sensor that allows it to directly compete with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the brand new Nikon D850.

Like the D850, the a7R III’s sensor is back-illuminated, giving it the ability to generate incredibly resolute and detailed images.

 Its autofocus system is, in a word, incredible.

With 399 phase-detect AF points and 425 contrast AF points, the a7R III is capable of speeds twice as fast in low-light shooting situations as its predecessor. Aiding in low-light shooting is the five-axis image stabilization that helps minimize camera shake and an ISO range that expands to 50-102,400.

Like it’s cousin the Sony a9, the a7R III is capable of shooting 10fps – in JPEG or in RAW. It can even do that while using autofocus tracking that has zero shutter blackout.

As nice as those features are, perhaps the most welcome news for Sony shooters is that the a7R III has much-improved battery life, though it would be hard not to have much-improved battery life being that the a7R II’s battery life is abysmal.

Using the Sony a9’s higher-capacity battery, you can expect to get about 650 shots. That still doesn’t compare to the more than 1,800 shots you can get with a Nikon D850, but it’s still an improvement.

Another holdover from the a9 is its enormous and beautiful 3.69-million dot electronic viewfinder that’s a joy to look at whether you’re shooting stills or video.

Speaking of video, the a7R III shoots 4K at 24fps or 30fps as well as 1080p video at 120fps.

Sony is Making Headway in the Full Frame Market

Beyond the fancy specifications, it should be noted how quickly Sony is pumping out new cameras and updates to its existing ones.

In the four years between the release of the Canon 5D Mark III and the Canon 5D Mark IV, Sony released the a7, the a7 II, the a7R, the a7S.

That means that Sony is serious about taking a bite out of Canon’s and Nikon’s market share in the full frame segment, and with this camera, which is priced about $100 lower than the Nikon D850 and the Canon 5D Mark IV, they have proven that they are certainly capable of creating something that will woo new customers over to their side.